Fatto in Italia

  • Format Feature Film
  • Status In Development
  • Genre Drama
  • Audience Teens | Young Adults | Adults
  • Rating PG-13
  • In the walled medieval city of Prato, a thousand-year history of Italian textile artisanship clashes with the forces of globalism and the local Chinese production of Pronto Moda (fast fashion), sometimes with deadly consequences. It is here that two young lovers – one Italian, one Chinese – must overcome racism, stereotyping, expectations and fears. And that’s just within their own families.

    Just north of Florence, Prato is home to some 3,000 Chinese businesses and around 40,000 Chinese – some legal, many more not – nearly all involved in manufacturing textiles and cheap clothes, all with the coveted “Made in Italy” label.

    The Chinese, most from the entrepreneurial city of Wenzhou, started arriving in Prato en masse in the 1990’s.

    Facing global competition, Prato mills and workshops, some of which made clothes and leather goods for the great fashion houses, began to subcontract their work out to Chinese. They were surprised when eventually the Chinese began to do the work on their own. Some failing Italian firms began cutting costs by closing down and renting to Chinese companies instead, who paid cash. Many artisans have become landlords, initially welcoming the money.

    There is local animosity towards the Chinese, who, according to the Italians, don’t play by the rules. They work 15-16 hours a day, in conditions and for wages that Italians would not contemplate; they go to their own schools and shop in their own shops in Chinatown. Most of the profits – on and off the books, go back to China rather than being invested locally.

    The Chinese say that they helped rescue Prato from economic irrelevance, and that the locals are jealous of their success. Some are doing quite well – driving fancy cars, wearing Bulgari watches, and dressing in the latest fashion - and complain that they are being targeted, like the Jews in the 1930’s.

    It’s common for Chinese to work, sleep and cook within the warehouses and workshops, saving money to pay off debts from their journey. Coinciding with the growing anti-immigrant movement in the country, and the election of a center-right mayor whose campaign capitalized on the fears of a “Chinese Invasion,” there have been mass police raids/inspections on Chinese businesses not following regulations or operating illegally. And in response there have been violent protests by Chinese locals.

    It is in this volatile setting that our story takes place.

Made in Italy

In the walled medieval city of Prato, a thousand-year history of Italian textile artisanship clashes with the forces of globalism and the local Chinese production of Pronto Moda (fast fashion), sometimes with deadly consequences. It is here that two young lovers – one Italian, one Chinese – must overcome racism, stereotyping, expectations and fears. And that’s just within their own families.

Just north of Florence, Prato is home to some 3,000 Chinese businesses and around 40,000 Chinese – some legal, many more not – nearly all involved in manufacturing textiles and cheap clothes, all with the coveted “Made in Italy” label.

The Chinese, most from the entrepreneurial city of Wenzhou, started arriving in Prato en masse in the 1990’s.

Facing global competition, Prato mills and workshops, some of which made clothes and leather goods for the great fashion houses, began to subcontract their work out to Chinese. They were surprised when eventually the Chinese began to do the work on their own. Some failing Italian firms began cutting costs by closing down and renting to Chinese companies instead, who paid cash. Many artisans have become landlords, initially welcoming the money.

There is local animosity towards the Chinese, who, according to the Italians, don’t play by the rules. They work 15-16 hours a day, in conditions and for wages that Italians would not contemplate; they go to their own schools and shop in their own shops in Chinatown. Most of the profits – on and off the books, go back to China rather than being invested locally.

The Chinese say that they helped rescue Prato from economic irrelevance, and that the locals are jealous of their success. Some are doing quite well – driving fancy cars, wearing Bulgari watches, and dressing in the latest fashion - and complain that they are being targeted, like the Jews in the 1930’s.

It’s common for Chinese to work, sleep and cook within the warehouses and workshops, saving money to pay off debts from their journey. Coinciding with the growing anti-immigrant movement in the country, and the election of a center-right mayor whose campaign capitalized on the fears of a “Chinese Invasion,” there have been mass police raids/inspections on Chinese businesses not following regulations or operating illegally. And in response there have been violent protests by Chinese locals.

It is in this volatile setting that our story takes place.

  • Documents
    Fatto in Italia - Pitch Deck
    22/06/2022
    Download